Type 2 Diabetes

Increased Dietary Intake of L-Arginine Linked to Increased Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

People who consume higher levels of dietary L-arginine, an amino acid involved in the metabolism of glutamate and proline, were found to have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (TD2), according to research results published in BMC Endocrine Disorders. In the context of total protein intake as well as L-arginine-to-protein ratio, however, no association was found between increased L-arginine intake and risk of T2D.

Research has suggested that L-arginine may be involved in nitric oxide-dependent pathways that affect the homeostasis of glucose and insulin. Currently, little data from long-term studies elucidate the effects of L-arginine intake on the risk for T2D.

In a recent prospective cohort study, a team of researchers from Iran examined the potential impact of dietary L-arginine intake on T2D incidence in 2139 adults (mean age, 38.9 years; 54.6% women) who participated in the third phase of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS) and who did not have T2D at baseline. Read more

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